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Home Β» Comedy Β» Cubby (2019): A Quirky Exploration of New York’s Unconventional Realities

"Cubby" follows the misadventures of Mark, an aspiring artist whose move to New York City sets off a chain of eccentric encounters and unexpected challenges. From deceiving his mother about a non-existent job to navigating the quirks of communal living, Mark's journey is as unpredictable as it is surreal. Along the way, he forms an unlikely bond with Milo, the child he babysits, and grapples with hallucinations of Leather-Man, a mysterious figure dispensing cryptic advice. As Mark confronts his anxieties and embraces his quirks, he navigates the complexities of adulting in the Big Apple, with both humorous and poignant results.

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Cubby (2019)
83 min | Comedy, Drama, Fantasy | 01 November 2019
4.8Rating: 4.8/10 from 278 users
Mark, a 20-something artist with a penchant for quirkiness and an anxiety disorder, impulsively moves to New York City, deceiving his mother about securing a job at an art gallery. Upon arrival, he finds himself in a communal living arrangement with former college acquaintance Noah-Gregg, diving headfirst into a world of group meals, yoga sessions, and unconventional roommates. Struggling to find stability, Mark takes on a babysitting gig, caring for a precocious six-year-old named Milo. As Mark grapples with his own quirks and insecurities, he embarks on a freewheeling descent into chaos and self-discovery.

 

 

“Cubby,” the semi-autobiographical brainchild of writer-director Mark Blane, offers a whimsical yet exasperating exploration of one man’s off-kilter journey through New York City. Premiering at esteemed film festivals like OutFest and Frameline before its theatrical release in LA and New York, “Cubby” presents a peculiar mix of charm and chaos that leaves viewers torn between admiration and frustration.

The film centers around Mark, a 20-something artist portrayed by Blane himself, who impulsively relocates to the Big Apple, misleading his mother about securing a job at an art gallery. Patricia Richardson shines as Mark’s concerned yet enabling mother, whose puzzling decision to drop him off with minimal support sets the tone for the film’s quirky unreality.

Upon arriving in New York, Mark finds himself in a communal living situation with former college acquaintance Noah-Gregg (John Duff), diving headfirst into a world of group meals, yoga sessions, and unconventional roommates. His haphazard search for stability leads him to a babysitting gig, caring for a precocious six-year-old named Milo.

Blane’s performance as Mark is refreshingly un-self-conscious, capturing the character’s self-sabotaging tendencies and anxiety-driven quirks with authenticity. However, the film’s treatment of Mark’s erratic behavior as endearing rather than concerning feels misguided, blurring the line between whimsy and irresponsibility.

The film’s visual aesthetic, shot on 16mm film, lends a dreamlike quality to the narrative, accentuated by animated flourishes that bring Mark’s drawings to life. While visually captivating, these elements sometimes overshadow the film’s narrative coherence, leaving audiences adrift in a sea of eccentricity.

Despite its brief 83-minute runtime, “Cubby” struggles to maintain its charm throughout, with dialogue veering into excessive twee territory that overstays its welcome. While early moments elicit chuckles, the novelty wears thin as the film progresses, making it feel longer than it is.

As Mark’s journey culminates in a hasty attempt at maturity, the film’s conclusion feels disappointingly thin and unearned, leaving viewers longing for a more substantial resolution. While “Cubby” showcases glimpses of Blane’s potential as a filmmaker, its shortcomings ultimately overshadow its quirky charm.

In the end, “Cubby” serves as a testament to the perils of unchecked eccentricity and the importance of narrative coherence in storytelling. While Blane’s future endeavors hold promise, “Cubby” falls short of its ambitions, leaving audiences with a bittersweet taste of New York’s unconventional realities.

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